365 Days of Hearthstone | The Year In Review

It's been over a month since 2019 ended, and likewise it's been over a month since I finished the 365 Days of Hearthstone challenge. So then why am I making another post? Well, because I'm curious! I''m curious to see how many class cards I made, how many cards with Taunt I made, how many Rogue Weapons I made - I'm curious to see how many cards I made within certain categories. One would think that with 365+ unique cards made over the course of 2019, I must have made a pretty big spread of cards. One would think...


So without further ado, let's take a look at the 365 Days of Hearthstone challenge now that it's over! Buckle up, this post is pretty hefty; there's a lot to talk about, so I hope you're ready to read about it! :D



Before we get into any actual cards, I just want to say...


I was nominated and voted the Best User of 2019 in the r/CustomHearthstone subreddit!!!


It means so much to me to see the support I recieved on the challenge, but it means even more to me to know that people enjoyed the cards that I made. Of course, not every card I made was amazing, but throughout the entire year I had people commenting on my cards and giving feedback or even messaging me telling me that I've inspired them. And now, there's even some people from the Discord server I started that have decided to take the challenge into 2020 for a whole 'nother round of 365 cards! Well this time it's 366 since it's a leap year, but you get the point. Anyways, I won't be doing the challenge this year, but I would highly recommend visiting the Discord channel to see the new group of people taking the challenge under their belt.



Next, I want to take a look at the top cards I've made within certain categories! For the Top 10 and Top 5 lists, I'll write a little description of each card - but know that certain cards will be repeated in this post, so I'm just going to be copying and pasting their description wherever they show up. I'll also be providing links to every single card's post on r/CustomHearthstone for you to see the original post, but remember: if a card has a * next to its upvote count, that means I changed it based on feedback from the subreddit, so it may appear different than on here.




1. A Year's Passing (3.5k upvotes, December 31st)

It's fitting how the final card I made for this challenge ended up as the most upvoted card of the year! That being said, I know most of the upvotes on this card were because of the hype behind the challenge ending as opposed to the card itself. Even then, it is so touching to me that so many people were excited to see my accomplishment come to an end :) And hey, now that post is the 5th highest rated post of all time on the r/CustomHearthstone subreddit! Woooo!


2. Tomb Rager (2.7k upvotes, July 4th)

One of my friends and I often make humorous cards and send them to each other, and Tomb Rager was one of them during the day before the release of Saviors of Uldum. But after I made it for that reason, I looked at it as an actual card and saw that it would be an interesting post in the subreddit. As another Rager making fun of Magma Rager, a lot of people liked the theme of the card and the use of the new keyword at the time, but it was noted that it could be used with things like Jungle Giants or generated from things like Evolve! I also submitted this card into the Uldum Conundrum card creation competition in the official Hearthstone Discord and I won first place!


3. The Pumpkin King (1.9k upvotes, October 31st)

My mom loves The Nightmare Before Christmas, so growing up I saw a lot of Jack Skellington around my house. For the Halloween-themed card, I was heavily inspired by the opening song, specifically the part where the Pumpking King jumps into the fountain and transforms into Jack. Likewise, this card has an effect that changes the Pumpkin King's effect at the end of your turn (similar to the worgens from The Witchwood). A lot of people really liked the concept of the card, where the keywords would swap at the end of the turn. This was even nominated and voted as one of the runner-ups for the most unique card of 2019 in the r/CustomHearthstone subreddit!


4. Warbringer Trodin (1.8k upvotes, December 17th)

I remember watching one of Brian Kibler's YouTube highlight videos where he was playing Hack the System Warrior and thinking to myself "hmm... this deck could be better". Warbringer Troding was created to bring out the best of that archetype since it was my favorite Quest from Saviors of Uldum. By spending 8-mana up front, the player then has 5 extra damage every time they swing with a Weapon! Looking back, this may have been a touch too strong since your opponent doesn't really get to interact with it unless it doesn't die, but a lot of people seemed to like the card!


5. Grandma Glek (1.7k* upvotes, December 22nd)

Grandma Glek is about as close as I think I can make a balanced Start Of Game card. She gives both players a Coin, allowing both players to ramp to an extra Mana for one turn. The thing is, the card was originally posted as a Neutral card in the subreddit, and people loved it even still. I think that allowing this card to be run in Rogue allows for pretty consistent turn 1 6/6 Edwin Van Cleef to happen in Standard, and I personally am not a fan of that. By moving this to Priest (which makes sense from the theme and the fact that Priest was given Gilded Gargoyle before), the card retains its theme while being more interesting!


6. Sabatooze (1.6k* upvotes, December 8th)

I love thinking of interesting ways to design Weapon removal in Hearthstone, and Sabatooze is one of my best attempts. The Weapon removal aspect of the card is definitely secondary because of how delayed it is, but the card also comes with Hero Power disruption, making your opponent's Hero Power do nothing until they use it. Originally the card was a 1-mana 2/1, but I figured that might be too irritating to play against when put into an aggressive deck, so bumping it up to 2-mana and giving it an extra point of Health seemed like the best way to adjust the card.


7. Zenbot (1.5k upvotes, March 29th)

Magnetic is a mechanic that's used with typically low attack values as to not allow for really high burst potential with Mechs. Because of that, Magnetic minions are often coupled with an effect or some keywords to turn them into interesting buffs. The start of Zenbot came from flipping this idea on its head: why not make a Magnetic minion with a downside? By giving it "Can't attack", it acts as a pretty nice standalone minion in silence decks, but can also be a nice buff to slap onto Taunts that you don't need to attack with in the first place!


8. Streetwise Scumbag (1.4k upvotes, May 4th)

I tried several times over the course of the year to make a card that gives your opponent Overload, and Streetwise Scumbag is the most popular attempt I had! The effect gives a random card in your opponent's deck Overload (1) Secretly, meaning they won't know it has Overload until they play it. I saw this as a pretty minor effect - albeit a good one - so I gave the minion a standard 3/4 body for 3-mana. This card has the potential to disrupt your opponent, but like any deck-shuffling card in the game, it's inconsistent and therefore can't be heavily relied on.


9. Pyrogue (1.4k* upvotes, December 18th)

Pyrogue was a card that went through a ton of iterations in my head - I was driving for five hours the day of this theme ("a card that generates an uncollectable card"), so I was working with a lot of ideas in my head. The one that stuck with me the most was Pyrogue because it generates a card that seems useless in isolation but explains its uses on the card itself; Pyrogue has a combo effect which hints at using the 0-mana Firestarter that does nothing to start other combos!


10. Duplihound (1.4k upvotes, May 2nd)

I genuinely did not expect this card to do as well as it did! The thing is, Duplihound has a lot of versatility; it synergizes very well with Veranus, essentially becoming a 2-card board clear. But other than that, it can be used as a Whirlwind with a final Arcane Shot all for only 2-mana! But if you can find a way to buff the attack of your Duplihounds, you can clear an even bulkier board.



Now I'll show off the Top 10 Upvoted Neutral cards and the Top 5 Upvoted cards for every class! Because of how many Neutral cards I made, there were a lot of notable cards to talk about. But as for the classes go, there wasn't that many of each class to begin with, so I cut down the highlights to only the Top 5. Regardless, there's still a LOT of cards to talk about, so get ready!



1. A Year's Passing (3.5k upvotes, December 31st)

It's fitting how the final card I made for this challenge ended up as the most upvoted card of the year! That being said, I know most of the upvotes on this card were because of the hype behind the challenge ending as opposed to the card itself. Even then, it is so touching to me that so many people were excited to see my accomplishment come to an end :) And hey, now that post is the 5th highest rated post of all time on the r/CustomHearthstone subreddit! Woooo!


2. Tomb Rager (2.7k upvotes, July 4th)

One of my friends and I often make humorous cards and send them to each other, and Tomb Rager was one of them during the day before the release of Saviors of Uldum. But after I made it for that reason, I looked at it as an actual card and saw that it would be an interesting post in the subreddit. As another Rager making fun of Magma Rager, a lot of people liked the theme of the card and the use of the new keyword at the time, but it was noted that it could be used with things like Jungle Giants or generated from things like Evolve! I also submitted this card into the Uldum Conundrum card creation competition in the official Hearthstone Discord and I won first place!


3. The Pumpkin King (1.9k upvotes, October 31st)

My mom loves The Nightmare Before Christmas, so growing up I saw a lot of Jack Skellington around my house. For the Halloween-themed card, I was heavily inspired by the opening song, specifically the part where the Pumpking King jumps into the fountain and transforms into Jack. Likewise, this card has an effect that changes the Pumpkin King's effect at the end of your turn (similar to the worgens from The Witchwood). A lot of people really liked the concept of the card, where the keywords would swap at the end of the turn. This was even nominated and voted as one of the runner-ups for the most unique card of 2019 in the r/CustomHearthstone subreddit!


4. Sabatooze (1.6k* upvotes, December 8th)

I love thinking of interesting ways to design Weapon removal in Hearthstone, and Sabatooze is one of my best attempts. The Weapon removal aspect of the card is definitely secondary because of how delayed it is, but the card also comes with Hero Power disruption, making your opponent's Hero Power do nothing until they use it. Originally the card was a 1-mana 2/1, but I figured that might be too irritating to play against when put into an aggressive deck, so bumping it up to 2-mana and giving it an extra point of Health seemed like the best way to adjust the card.


5. Zenbot (1.5k upvotes, March 29th)

Magnetic is a mechanic that's used with typically low attack values as to not allow for really high burst potential with Mechs. Because of that, Magnetic minions are often coupled with an effect or some keywords to turn them into interesting buffs. The start of Zenbot came from flipping this idea on its head: why not make a Magnetic minion with a downside? By giving it "Can't attack", it acts as a pretty nice standalone minion in silence decks, but can also be a nice buff to slap onto Taunts that you don't need to attack with in the first place!


6. Right-Hand Man (1.4k* upvotes, February 23rd)

Effects that happen in-hand are far and few between in Hearthstone, and Right-Hand Man was one of my earliest attempt at coming up with something interesting. The original design allowed for discounted minions to cost 0-mana, which was any Zoo Deck's dream. I changed it to not be able to do this, but looking back I honestly don't think this should be printed solely because it's difficult for people to understand why a card randomly costs 1-mana less when you play it. Sure, people can get accustomed to it, but newer players wouldn't understand which could just lead to frustration.


7. Ajk'lah the Librarian (1.1k upvotes, June 2nd)

Ajk'lah is a simple card that garnered a lot of attention most likely from its simplicity. As a 5-mana 5/6 minion, you're not giving up a lot to play it, but the effect of Silencing minions can affect your own minions or even Ajk'lah herself! You could potentially use this to your own advantage and Silence minions with bad effects or Silence Ajk'lah before attacking with valuable minions.


8. Rag-gnome-os (1.1k* upvotes, January 16th)

After I found this art of a firey gnome with a staff, my brain instantly thought it had the same energy as Ragnaros with his firey body and hammer that he holds up high. This card is essentially a small Ragnaros, but originally would deal 2-damage randomly as a non-Legendary minion. This could result in too much of a swing in the early game, so I reduced the card to be as small as possible: a 1-Mana 1/1 that deals 1 damage like Ragnaros.


9. Stocking Stuffer (1.0k upvotes, December 25th)

I love Christmas, and thus making a Christmas-themed card was a ton of fun for me. Stocking Stuffer takes the idea of waiting to open your presents until Christmas and "game-ifies" it. By default, all you get when this dies is a 1/1 lump of coal, and no one wants that! But by waiting until Christmas (which just so happens to always be 2 turns away), you'll receive a random Legendary card to play with!


10. Wishing Well (654 upvotes, July 21st)

Wish is one of my favorite uncollectable cards in the game, yet you can't actually get a hold of it in constructed play. To make this happen, I made Wishing Well, which gives you the potential to play Wish so long as you toss some Coins into the well! Because of how strong Wish is though, the card gets shuffled into your deck so that you aren't guaranteed the swing from playing Wish. It also makes sense since usually wishes take time to come true - otherwise I would be a millionaire right now! Right?




1. Warbringer Trodin (1.8k upvotes, December 17th)

I remember watching one of Brian Kibler's YouTube highlight videos where he was playing Hack the System Warrior and thinking to myself "hmm... this deck could be better". Warbringer Trodin was created to bring out the best of that archetype since it was my favorite Quest from Saviors of Uldum. By spending 8-mana up front, the player then has 5 extra damage every time they swing with a Weapon! Looking back, this may have been a touch too strong since your opponent doesn't really get to interact with it unless it doesn't die, but a lot of people seemed to like the card!


2. Wrath Vanguard (985 upvotes, December 28st)

Wrath Vanguard was a card with made a simple purpose outside of that day's theme: to make a card that truly felt like a Warrior card. Seeing as how Warrior has a lot of self-damaging effects and Taunt cards, I combined them to make a pretty hefty Taunt that can not only proc your own minions effects but also help deal with wide boards against more aggressive decks!


3. Cavern Hoarder (505 upvotes, May 21st)

Cards that give information for what your opponent is playing are extremely rare in Hearthstone, and Cavern Hoarder is one that I made that has other uses. By gaining Armor equal to the cost of a card your opponent draws when you play this, you can potentially guess what card your opponent has in their hand now based on its cost. This upside is very minor, but attached to the prime stats of a 4/6 body on a 4-mana minion and the Armor gain, it balances out with the consistency of the opponent drawing as a downside.


4. Crumbling Colossus (352 upvotes, March 19th)

Oh boy do I love cards that can't attack! Crumbling Colossus has a huge body for its mana cost (in fact, it's the infamous 4-mana 7/7 statline!), but it can't attack. Additionally, it has the passive effect of dealing 1 damage to every minion at the end of your turns, which includes not only your own minions but itself as well. Plopping this down against aggressive decks could help gradually take down their boards!


5. Bloodthirsty Chieftain (322* upvotes, March 12th)

Rush and Overkill are often coupled with each other on minions since they work so well with each other, and Bloodthirsty Chieftain has that with the addition of giving more minions Rush when it's Overkill triggers. Some people saw this as too strong with the original 4/4 statline, so I changed it to a 4/3 to still have the impact it had before while being a bit squishier.




1. Streetwise Scumbag (1.4k upvotes, May 4th)

I tried several times over the course of the year to make a card that gives your opponent Overload, and Streetwise Scumbag is the most popular attempt I had! The effect gives a random card in your opponent's deck Overload (1) Secretly, meaning they won't know it has Overload until they play it. I saw this as a pretty minor effect - albeit a good one - so I gave the minion a standard 3/4 body for 3-mana. This card has the potential to disrupt your opponent, but like any deck-shuffling card in the game, it's inconsistent and therefore can't be heavily relied on.


2. Totemic Ice Ward (274* upvotes, October 28th)

Ever since Freeze Shaman was printed, failed, and then forgotten, I took it upon myself to try to come up with interesting ways to make that archetype actually happen. Funnily enough, Totemic Ice Ward wasn't a Freeze card at first, but was functionally the same in that it made an enemy minion unable to attack. People liked the idea, and when it was brought up that it could just Freeze an enemy minion and still act the same way, I immediately hopped onto that idea. It's funny how I made quite a few Freeze Shaman cards yet the one that did the best was the one that didn't even start as a Freeze Shaman card.


3. Totemic Cleaver (187 upvotes, November 29th)

Shamans can summon lots of Totems, and everyone knows that. But what Shaman can't really do is benefit from having a lot of Totems other than through things like Bloodlust, which can just be done with any wide board. Totemic Cleaver is a pretty unassuming card at first, but if it's not dealt with properly, it can spiral out of control and start to amass a large amount of attack. While this isn't a strong enough win condition on its own, it certainly helps give Totem Shaman the push that it needs!


4. Wind Blast (167* upvotes, March 16th)

Windfury is something that's been printed on Minions and Weapons, but never on Spells. Wait, how would that even work? Wind Blast is how! I mean sure, it doesn't have Windfury itself, but it casts itself twice if you control a Windfury minion, so it's pretty much the same thing, right? A 4-mana spell that can deal 8 damage is nothing to scoff at, and if some sort of aggressive Windfury Shaman could come together, it's pretty realistic to see Wind Blast securing that deck lethal by using it on the opponent's face.


5. Stormcaller Ashoa (129 upvotes, April 23rd)

I HIGHLY advise you to click on the link to the Reddit post of this card simply to see what exactly replacing your hero with Al'Akir looks like. Essentially, you become a Totem-summoning Machine with Windfury and the ability to create Divine Shields on yourself! Stormcaller Ashoa was my best attempt at giving Totem Shaman a solid win condition, since Al'Akir's Windfury Weapon could get out of control easily with the use of buffs. Not only that, but the potential to spawn more Totems ensures that the card still supports a Totem Shaman gameplan!




1. Pyrogue (1.4k* upvotes, December 18th)

Pyrogue was a card that went through a ton of iterations in my head - I was driving for five hours the day of this theme ("a card that generates an uncollectable card"), so I was working with a lot of ideas in my head. The one that stuck with me the most was Pyrogue because it generates a card that seems useless in isolation but explains its uses on the card itself; Pyrogue has a combo effect which hints at using the 0-mana Firestarter that does nothing to start other combos!


2. Zapgrip (1.1k upvotes, December 6th)

Zapgrip is a very versatile weapon that can be used by all sorts of archetypes. Aggressive decks can use it to try to remove annoying Taunts with their face as opposed to with their minions, and control decks can pair this with weapon buffing cards to create a good removal tool. I did have a concern that the card may be a bit too strong, but the general consensus was that it was good, but not too good.


3. Cybernetic Needlearm (574 upvotes, November 20th)

As an attempt to allow Control Rogue to finally happen, Cybernetic Needlearm is a high-cost Weapon with the ability to refresh itself for low cost. The whole idea of dumping mana to keep this card alive may seem pretty bad, but each use of a 2-mana Hero Power to refresh the weapon is essentially a 2-mana 4/2 weapon, so the only real downside is the initial 6-mana cost for the 4/3 weapon.


4. Voodoo Thief Uha (521 upvotes, April 26th)

I am well aware that Twinspell isn't supposed to be given to EVIL classes, but Voodoo Thief Uha is SO evil that he's stealing Twinspell from other classes... kinda. This card pushes burgle Rogue by giving each spell you have from another class Twinspell, allowing you to double the resources in your hand given that they weren't originally even yours! Woohoo stealing!


5. Ellie, Queen of Cards (482* upvotes, March 4th)

This is by far my favorite Hero card I made and was close to making my top 10 favorite cards list. Ellie is interesting in that she gives every card in your deck "Combo: Draw a card", but first you have to discard your hand. She also equips a 1/2 Weapon that draws a card upon breaking, which was added for players to swing on the turn played on the turn after to give them another card to use the Combo effect with! Ellie essentially turns your deck into a miracle deck when played, but works best with low-cost cards. This card was changed from 5-mana to 6-mana though since turn 5 seemed a tad too early to be able to start going crazy with Combos.




1. Adusto, Moving Sun (1.3k* upvotes, December 23rd)

Divine Shield is a nice and simple keyword that I enjoy, but I find it surprising that there's never been a card that gives your hero Divine Shield. Adusto, Moving Sun is one of many cards I designed to try to give your hero Divine Shield, and Adusto does it three times! The interesting thing about Divine Shield on your hero is that it's really only super valuable on your turn because on your opponent's turn it can be taken care of by any source of damage without having any minions take damage. Maybe this card could encourage a Weapon-heavy control Paladin deck!


2. Oathhammer (509 upvotes, August 28th)

I remember back when Blackrock Mountain came out and I thought Dragon Consort was one of the coolest designs. It was so simple and the effect carried over between turns, allowing you to potentially get some powerhouse like Ysera out two turns early. Likewise, Oathhammer grants you discounts of 5-mana on the next minion you play, but this doesn't carry over between turns. This sounds crazy, but the effect is attached to a very expensive weapon and an Overkill effect. It takes effort to make it work, but when it does, that 6-mana Ysera will look like child's play next to your 4-mana Ysera!


3. The Infinite Shell (202 upvotes, January 31st)

If there's one thing you should know about me, it's that I love mid-range and control decks. I think being able to do crazy things with bigger minions is so cool, and The Infinite Shell paves a path for some crazy Mech-based synergy. Whenever this dies, it reattaches itself to a Mech in your hand, keeping all enchantments and buffs from any previous live it had. The downside is that you have to pay 5-mana for a pretty abysmal 1/4 body, but over time this card will begin to pay for itself!


4. Right the Wrong (131* upvotes, January 13th)

There's a lot of slight design in this card that can be missed at first glance. To get the benefit of discounting your right-most card by 3-mana, you need your opponent to play their left-most card in hand. This means that your opponent has to play the card they've been holding onto the longest in order to discount the card you got most recently. This was done to prevent any sort of consistency in a combo deck since two copies of this allow for a total of 6-mana reduction. Of course, you can try to keep a card in your right-most position to get a discount on a specific card, so the potential is still there, just more difficult to do!


5. Shadelight Vindicator (112 upvotes, July 3rd)

Shadelight Vindicator is weird in that it interacts with pre-existing Paladin cards but does something that's never really been done in Paladin before. It's very easy to generate Silver Hand Recruits with your Hero Power and cards like Lost in the Jungle, but there's not too much synergy with shuffling 1/1 Undead into your opponent's deck. Even though there isn't a lot of combos, it still acts as deck disruption to your opponent; interrupting their draw with a measly 1/1 is pretty good. Additionally, you can always interrupt any singleton decks by shuffling a multitude of Undead into your opponent's deck!




1. Duplihound (1.4k upvotes, May 2nd)

I genuinely did not expect this card to do as well as it did! The thing is, Duplihound has a lot of versatility; it synergizes very well with Veranus, essentially becoming a 2-card board clear. But other than that, it can be used as a Whirlwind with a final Arcane Shot all for only 2-mana! But if you can find a way to buff the attack of your Duplihounds, you can clear an even bulkier board.


2. Riverbed Snapshell (978* upvotes, November 30th)

To help synergize with the Hero Power focused archetype pushed in Descent of Dragons, Riverbed Snapshell was made to give more late-game options to that archetype. The card was also created with Arena in mind, since Hunter isn't a traditionally control-focused class in constructed. Originally, the card only gained +3/+3 from having your Hero Power flipped over, but this was buffed to +5/+5 since you usually have to wait a turn after playing this to be able to get its effect to trigger; Hero Powers cost 2-mana, so you can't play this and use your Hero Power in one turn most of the time.


3. Shadowbeast (821 upvotes, November 18th)

Shadowbeast combines two Hunter themes nicely into one card: Rush and Deathrattle. It's not uncommon to have your Rush minion die after attacking for the first time, so having Deathrattle effects on minions with Rush makes sense. But when making this, I thought "Why not let the player choose what that Deathrattle is?". Of course, that choice only goes so far since it selects randomly from cards in your hand, but you can still use this alongside something like Sylvanas or Kathrena to get a strong Deathrattle along with 6 damage worth of removal!


4. Serpent Shot (445 upvotes, October 20th)

When I design cards, my process usually starts with a theme or with the card's flavor and then the balance comes when I settle on an idea I like. Serpent Shot was one of those cards; I found the art and thought it was very Hearthstone-esque to have a spell that literally just shoots a snake at your opponent. My thought was that Emperor Cobra, the closest card I can think of being the "default" snake in Hearthstone, has Poisonous, so shooting it at a minion would instantly kill it. Then the snake is mad at you for using it as ammunition, so it joins your opponent's board!


5. Gunman Gotah (235 upvotes, November 5th)

Gunman Gotah was designed long before the full card list of Descent of Dragons was revealed, and now that I know all of those cards, I would definitely bump its cost up to 4-mana. But at the time of the card being posted, we didn't know the full potential of face Hunter, so I thought creating a card to active your Hero Power twice would allow for neat interactions with cards like Dragonbane!




1. Savage Rootlurker (330* upvotes, March 22nd)

Druid has had a lot of different archetypes given to them, and some have been more fleshed out than others. Attack Druid, if that's what it's called, is one that has been less refined than others, so Savage Rootlurker was made as another slot in that deck. By giving your hero Lifesteal, you can make riskier trades hurt a lot less and even begin healing a bit every turn. By also adding a Battlecry to give your Hero some attack, the card works off of itself in what it is trying to achieve. The only issue with the original design was that it was a bit too over the top, so by bumping its health down from 5 to 4 it becomes a lot more manageable for your opponent to deal with.


2. Treeswinger (287 upvotes, June 29th)

Treeswinger was made as more of a flavorful card than a powerful card. It's important in any card game to have cards that are weaker than other cards to allow for more rewarding pulls and whatnot, but that does not mean that the weaker cards can't be fun and interesting. This card is made to be used in a Treant-focused deck, and when this is played you can destroy a Treant to buff this minion and give it Immune while attacking, he's literally using the Treant as a Weapon!


3. Spring Bloom (255 upvotes, June 8th)

1-mana card draw has always been the talk of the town; some people think any 1-mana draw effect is too strong, while others thing it's fine but has to be made interesting. Spring Bloom is a 1-mana draw that then places a Treant on top of your deck - this can be seen as both an upside and a downside. The downside is that the Treant clogs up your deck for a turn, preventing you from drawing cards you want, but the upside is that your next draw is a guaranteed 1-mana 2/2. In a Treant deck, this upside can be pushed even further!


4. Treemwork! (224* upvotes, December 21st)

I love Treant Druid. Why? Well, I just like the theme of Treants and I think making a Treant-focused deck is fun. Seeing as how Treant decks work best as token/tempo/aggro decks, I wanted to make a card that could add as a nice finisher similar to Bloodlust. Treemwork! originally scaled for every single Treant you had, making it pretty horrifying if you had a board full of Treants. Because of this, I adjusted it to more of a binary where you get +3/+3 (which is essentially a permanent and sticky Bloodlust) so long as you just have at least three Treants. It still operates the same but becomes a lot less dangerous!


5. Thornbiter (223* upvotes, January 4th)

Another Treant-related card? You bet! Originally, Thornbiter had the same effect but was a 1/1 with Poisonous on its own. This proved to be a bit much, since you could generate two Poisonous minions with one card. I then removed the Poisonous from the card itself and gave it an additional attack. This was made before the reveal of Rise of Shadows, and it turns out Blizzard released a very similar card with Toxfin, which is almost the same but for Murlocs instead. Since Murlocs are much more expansive than Treants, it may be worth looking at this card again and giving it a bit of a buff.




1. Cursed Crown (1.1k* upvotes, October 30th)

One of my favorite cards ever printed was Explorer's Hat, not only because of it's effect but how that works with the flavor of the card. It all feels so perfectly compact in its design! Cursed Crown took heavy inspiration from Explorer's Hat but serves as removal instead of a buff. When this is used on an enemy minion, the opponent will receive a copy of the card, so maybe using it on your own minions that you want to destroy is an option to explore. I also changed the order of the words on the card to make it clearer to the user that the a copy of the card is still generated if the selected minion dies.


2. Disco Rager (448 upvotes, March 21st)

Disco Rager is a bit of an oddity because at first glance it seems to be extremely underwhelming and underpowered. Its classic 3-mana 5/1 Rager statline is nothing to write home about, and its Deathrattle will just keep discarding cards for you. The thing is, the card should only ever be run in a discard-focused deck; a deck that can reliably discard a couple of cards from this minion is sure to progress Lakkari Sacrifice at a very rapid pace. And hey, maybe this can add more reason to run Fist of Jaraxxus!


2. Titan Bind (448 upvotes, June 27th)

As someone that likes playing slower paced decks, I always love seeing interesting ways to design removal spells, and Titan Bind does so by making use of one of my personal favorite mechanics in Hearthstone: dormant. For 3-mana, you can choose a minion and make it go dormant, and in order to wake it up your opponent has to play a minion that costs more than the dormant minion. This removal spell works exceptionally well on bigger minions, since it removes more chances for your opponent to awaken the minion. This is also a notably good counter against most Giants, since they usually have costs above 10-mana!


4. Highway to Fel (322 upvotes, December 29th)

My dad loves rock music, and growing up I was exposed to a lot of music from Queen, KISS, AC/DC, and more. Highway to Hell is a classic song, and when I thought of the pun for Highway to Fel, I knew I had to try to design a card to fit that name. Warlock has a variety of board clears, so I went along the route of making the card a board-clear with a high cost and high damage output. To push the Demon-them, I also thought it would make sense to have Demons spawn for each Demon that died - it's not a properly demonic mosh pit without some bloodshed!


5. Cultist of the Damned (176 upvotes, April 11th)

The problem with most discard cards is that, well, you're discarding a card. Once that card is discarded, there's really nothing you can do with it since it's gone. But Cultist of the Damned allows for you to literally use what you discard! You can Discard something like a Twisting Nether to create a delayed board wipe to make things awkward for your opponent to play against, or you can Discard something like Fiendish Rites to give the card a more aggressive use!




1. Snowball Fight! (1.3k upvotes, July 14th)

I think the best types of designs are ones that have multiple uses; cards that lock themselves into one real use are good in their own right, but they don't create a lot of interesting decision making for the most part. Snowball Fight! has that multi-purpose aspect to it since it can be used to try to Freeze your opponent's board while dealing small damage or to remove one big minion. This card also has a lot of similarities to Dark Skies, which is neat to see since I didn't know about that card until way after I made this one!


2. Omega Livewire (475 upvotes, December 24th)

I was never really a fan of Omega cards since they're almost useless until you reach 10 mana, but designing Omega Livewire let me appreciate them more. The effect of an Omega card is more of a reward for making it until turn 10 and allows for more control-heavy decks, which I'm all for! Omega Livewire is a standard 3-mana 3/3 but lets you draw a spell from your deck while also giving it +3 Spell Damage. If you draw something like a Flamestrike, you can be sure to wipe down any board your opponent has, but if you draw something like Fireball you can burst your opponent's face down in one final combo!


3. Dune Shifter (385 upvotes, August 9th)

I'm going to be honest: I do not like playing against Secret Mage. That being said, I keep finding myself making Mage cards that interact with Secrets... Anyways, Dune Shifter is one of those cards, but it is much slower than what is typically seen in an aggressive Secret Mage deck. This card rewards you for having multiple secrets out at once, since every single one can summon a new Dune Shifter when played!


4. Keeper of Power (254* upvotes, July 26th)

Keeper of Power is interesting in that it scales both positively and negatively for each Secret you have in play. The more Secrets you have, the less it costs, but the less damage it deals when played. I like this interaction, since then you really have to think about when the best possible time to play it would be! I did have to alter the card's original design since it could originally hit the enemy's face, resulting in little to no reason to ever want to reduce its cost in a burn-focused deck.


5. Cantrip Mastery (190 upvotes, January 29th)

Rastakhan's Rumble pushed a Hero Power focused Mage theme which lead to some really cool cards like Daring Fire-Eater and Jan'alai, the Dragonhawk. Cantrip Mastery boosts this theme by rewarding decks for dealing damage with your Hero Power. What is the reward? Well, more damage from your Hero Power! With two copies, your Hero Power can start to deal 3 damage, and if you run Coldarra Drake in Wild, you could make a machine-gun Mage deck!




1. Grandma Glek (*1.7k upvotes, December 22nd)

Grandma Glek is about as close as I think I can make a balanced Start Of Game card. She gives both players a Coin, allowing both players to ramp to an extra Mana for one turn. The thing is, the card was originally posted as a Neutral card in the subreddit, and people loved it even still. I think that allowing this card to be run in Rogue allows for pretty consistent turn 1 6/6 Edwin Van Cleef to happen in Standard, and I personally am not a fan of that. By moving this to Priest (which makes sense from the theme and the fact that Priest was given Gilded Gargoyle before), the card retains its theme while being more interesting!


2. For the Greater Good (1.0k upvotes, April 14th)

This is a sad case of a card being ruined by the existence of one card: Recurring Villain. I absolutely adore Recurring Villain's design, but these two cards can not exist in the same game since a permanent +3/+3 buff to Recurring Villain means it will never go away. If that card didn't exist, then maybe For the Greater Good could be printed! You're sacrificing one your own minion to buff future copies of that minion, so this card works best with some sort of minion-copying or resurrecting effects.


3. Unfaithful Apprentice (311 upvotes, February 16th)

Shadow Priest has been a recurring theme for Priest since Hearthstone's inception, but there haven't really been too many good Shadow Priest decks. The closest ones I can think of are aggressive ones utilizing Shadowbomber and Extra Arms, but after Extra Arms got its buff reverted that deck hasn't really gotten too much luck . Unfaithful Apprentice gives that type of deck another 1-drop to run, but this one just has good stats with the potential to get self-Mindblasted later on in the game. Maybe giving Priest good 1-drops isn't a good idea since that's one of their weak points, but this could help push a traditionally weak archetype!


4. Crazed Reflection (204 upvotes, February 24th)

Crazed Reflection was created to be a form of removal with the potential small upside of "stealing" a Deathrattle on an enemy minion, but this is very niche. It's essentially a less consistent Assassinate since its not guaranteed that the targeted minion will be able to kill itself. But there does remain the potential to create a copy of an important enemy minion with more Health than Attack while still dealing damage to it. I think this card could potentially be 4-mana, but I think that it's hard to tell and needs to be tested with the pool of cards in Standard at any given time.


5. Death's Beckon (187 upvotes, September 23rd)

A 2-mana spell that deals 5-damage is very strong; it's better than both Shadow Bolt and Lava Shock. That said, Death's Beckon has the attached effect of reviving any minion Overkilled by this damage. This adds a lot of versatility to the card, allowing you to use it as removal on enemy minions with 5 or more health OR to help trigger friendly Deathrattles while still keeping the minion intact.



And the last Top 10 category we have is my own Personal Favorite cards that I made! I've been looking forwards to making this section for months because a lot of the cards I liked didn't really get time in the spotlight, so now I finally get to talk about them in more detail!



1. Haywire Flywire (249 upvotes, November 13th)

Mega Windfury is a keyword that we've only ever seen printed twice before, and for good reason too. It's such a strong keyword that can easily spiral out of control, so I'm glad that it's not any more commonplace. The reason I like Haywire Flywire so much is because it uses Mega-Windfury in such a simple and understandable way. Any Hearthstone player can look at this card and see the the card's issues and potential. Building a deck around this card would be so much fun; you need to find a way to get one Haywire Flywire to stick for a turn, use another one to give it Mega Windfury, and then buff its attack to hopefully kill the opponent. It's a classic deck-building-challenge Epic card, and I personally would love to try to make it work in-game.


2. Silver Duelist (100 upvotes, September 14th)

Weapon removal cards are typically very binary in Hearthstone - you just destroy the weapon or damage it. I like trying to come up with more creative ways to take an opponent's Weapon out, and Silver Duelist is my favorite of those designs. It forces your opponent to attack this minion, which removes a Durability from the weapon. The enemy will also take 5 damage from attacking the minion, and because it has Divine Shield, Silver Duelist can take any amount of damage from this effect without faltering. And what happens if your opponent is running any Weapons? Well, then you just play a 6-mana 5/5 with Divine Shield! Even when it's not used for its purpose, it's still a decent enough minion to play.


3. Oldport Negotiator (461 upvotes, April 19th)

I knew when I made Oldport Negotiator that it would be one of my favorite cards for the rest of the year, and it's because of how each different aspect of the card comes together: the effect, the art, the name, and the balance. He's a pirate that wants nothing more than to steal some coin, so playing him when your opponent has a Coin takes it away from them. Because the Coin is given to one player randomly, its unfair for the opponent to just have the Coin taken away from them, so the added effect of losing -1/-1 in stats when stealing a Coin is added so that the minion isn't too one-sided. The art and the name also add another level of flavor to this card that I can't get over; of course a Pirate would consider this whole interaction to be a "negotiation".


4. Leering Gargoyle (218 upvotes, August 5th)

The Inspire keyword was introduced way back in The Grand Tournament, and it didn't really perform that well at all. Because of that, it remains as one of Hearthstone's forgotten keywords, but I personally really like it since it adds an extra effect to your Hero Power. Leering Gargoyle combines Inspire with another one of my favorite mechanics (can't attack) to create a card that I am proud of. A 5-mana 5/10 minion is ridiculous, but because it can't attack it seems a bit weak. That's where the Inspire effect comes into play; it attacks a random enemy minion, meaning it's essentially a source of 5-damage until it dies!


5. Tomb Rager (2.7k upvotes, July 4th)

One of my friends and I often make humorous cards and send them to each other, and Tomb Rager was one of them during the day before the release of Saviors of Uldum. But after I made it for that reason, I looked at it as an actual card and saw that it would be an interesting post in the subreddit. As another Rager making fun of Magma Rager, a lot of people liked the theme of the card and the use of the new keyword at the time, but it was noted that it could be used with things like Jungle Giants or generated from things like Evolve! I also submitted this card into the Uldum Conundrum card creation competition in the official Hearthstone Discord and I won first place!


6. Party Dragon (363 upvotes, February 26th)

Party Dragon is an overall fun card. It's overstatted for its cost, which is the initial incentive to play it, but the downside is to Discover a card in your opponent's deck and give it to them. This downside has some positive aspects to it; not only do you get to choose what card to give them, you get to see what cards they are running. Party Dragon can also be used a lot when playing against friends to try to pull off some crazy combos by duplicating cards in your opponent's deck!


7. Sabatooze (1.6k* upvotes, December 8th)

I love thinking of interesting ways to design Weapon removal in Hearthstone, and Sabatooze is one of my best attempts. The Weapon removal aspect of the card is definitely secondary because of how delayed it is, but the card also comes with Hero Power disruption, making your opponent's Hero Power do nothing until they use it. Originally the card was a 1-mana 2/1, but I figured that might be too irritating to play against when put into an aggressive deck, so bumping it up to 2-mana and giving it an extra point of Health seemed like the best way to adjust the card.


8. Leapstomper (44 upvotes, June 24th)

Leapstomper didn't seem to do too well in the subreddit, so why do I like it so much? Well, it's simple. I like Shaman, and I like frogs. This is a frog for Shaman that jumps around the board, killing whatever it lands on. I love that idea, and I think the use of the word "jump" is fun, since it makes enough sense to be printed on a card while encouraging the theme of the card. As for its balance, it may be a bit wacky since the Overkill effect could keep triggering and kill off multiple random minions, but I think that just adds to the fun of it since you can't choose what it jumps on. What you can choose is the first minion you kill with it during its Rush turn, so typically you will be killing 1 more enemy minion than friendly minions.


9. Sic 'Em! (229* upvotes, January 6th)

The idea for this card was something that I had brewing in my head for a while, and the 365 Days of Hearthstone challenge was the perfect excuse to try to make it happen. This card lets you play an aggressive Hunter deck that can bypass Taunts for lethal, all while using my favorite keyword: Echo. Originally, I priced the card at 3-mana, but many people thought that was too high to be worth running, so bumping it down to 2-mana allows you to have 5 minions attack the enemy hero as opposed to just 3 when you have 10-mana.


10. Snarlroot (218* upvotes, July 6th)

Snarlroot makes use of the Choose One effects that you don't choose, which I think is a really neat idea. This idea was explore with Keeper Stelladris, which gives you a copy of both the option you chose and the option you didn't choose into your hand, but only works with spells. Snarlroot works with minions, meaning you could give it charge for burst damage by using Druid of the Claw and choosing the Taunt option. And that's only one possible idea with the card; with the addition of every new Choose One card, the options available with this card grow and grow.



And with the conclusion of the Top 10 and Top 5 lists, let's take a look at some overall statistics. Data analysis is something I've always been interested in but have never really gotten super involved with, and the conclusions of the 365 Days of Hearthstone challenge gave me a perfect reason to look into it! If you want to look at the original spreadsheet I used to compile all of this data, click on that hyperlink!




Here's an image showing off the amount of cards I made for each class. As you can see, Neutral had the overwhelming majority, but that makes sense since it's the most applicable "class" in that it can be used by any class. As for the actual classes, I made a ton of Shaman cards, which is to be expected since its my favorite class. What's surprising to me is how many Rogue cards I made since I don't really have any sort of affinity for that class at all. In fact I would even say that it's among my less enjoyed classes to play. But I guess creating cards for a class is different than actually playing it! Oh, and as expected, I made less cards for Hunter than any other class, and that's simply because I feel like Hunter is fairly one dimensional in its identity outside of a few interesting archetypes. But that's just me!




As far as rarities go, there's not a whole lot to unpack asides from how I made more Legendary cards than Common cards. I think that's because a good Common card is more difficult to design than a good Legendary in my opinion, since Common cards have to be very simple and easy to understand while trying to be as interesting as possible. Legendary cards can be as crazy as possible so long as they're more or less balanced because hey - it's a Legendary!




I guess I really enjoyed making Weapons, huh? Every single class except for Druid (because of Twig of the World Tree causing problems) and Mage (don't really have a solid reason here) and the Neutral category got Weapons, with Rogue getting a whopping total of 8. I also managed to make 9 Hero cards, but half of the classes didn't get a single one. Hero cards are hard to design and you have to invest a ton of time into refining them to make sure they're balanced, which as the year went on I begin to have less and less of.




Now, the strangest part about this chart is that I made 3 Murlocs. Why is that strange? Well, because I love Murlocs! I even own 2 Murloc Funko Pop figures and one of my first decent decks I ever made was a Murloc Shaman deck. I guess I just never felt inspired to make any fishy Murlocs throughout the year. Also, apparently my favorite minion type is Mechs, which I wasn't really aware of but speaking by the numbers I designed a lot of them. And if you take a look at Warlock - I made both a Pirate for Warlock and a Totem for Warlock. Isn't that fun?




I've always traditionally struggled with making higher-cost cards and tend to make smaller cards. I think it's a lot more fun to be able to play multiple cards per turn and have them interact with each other, and typically cards with higher Cost take up your entire turn. I also never really ventured above 10-mana other than two times, both of which were Neutral cards. And once again, Warlock is another standout class in that it is the ONLY class that didn't get a 10-mana card, and that can be chocked up to a mistake on my part. You see, when I made the spreadsheet for themes before the challenge started, I made a theme for each mana cost between 1 and 10 for each class, and there was a theme to make a 10-mana card for Warlock. The thing is, when I pulled that theme I guess my brain just said "hey, why not Shaman?" and I made a 10-mana Shaman card instead. This also explains why Shaman is the only class outside of Neutral that has two 10-mana cards! Oh, and one last note: I made more 3-mana cards than any other cost!




Turns out, I also liked the number 3 when it came to attack, with a total of 66 cards made that have 3 attack. Other than that, there was not a lot heavy-hitting cards with high attack values; I only ever ventured up to the 9-attack ceiling, and even then I only made one card with 9-attack. Outside of these two points, there really isn't any interesting points to bring up about this statistic.




Wow! I didn't make any 0-health cards! Who would've thought? Anyways, the most popular health count I made was 4, so based off of this and the stats for mana and attack, I am more likely to make a 3-mana 3/4 card than any other statline. It also seems like the trend of not making big cards runs true in health, seenig as how the drop-off from 8-health cards to 9-health cards is pretty significant. And if I were to pool together the 9, 10, and 11+ cards into one group, it would only be 8 cards anyways!



And now, the final and beefiest of all the statistics: keywords. I wasn't going to do this initially, but then the thought of doing it popped into my head, and well, I couldn't just not do it. The reason this post took so long is because of these charts for keywords, so hopefully it was worth it! Because of how unique each keyword is, I'll be taking a look at every single keyword and saying something short about each one! Because of how many keywords there are in the game, I had to split it all up into three different images since it would look too clunky and gross as one image.



  • Adapt: Adapt is a keyword that's thematically locked into the expansion it came from, so I didn't feel as if there was enough interesting design space to explore with the card. Therefore I only made 1 Adapt card.

  • Battlecry: Battlecry is such a simple keyword, and it's a necessary one too. It allows for minions to have effects when played, which is such a core part of any card game. Because of this, it's no surprise that the most popular keyword for my cards was Battlecry, with over 100 different uses.

  • Charge: Who remembers when Blizzard printed Charge cards? I do, and I don't miss it at all Rush was introduced as a healthier replacement for Charge since Charge allowed for instant burst combos that your opponent can't really play around, which isn't interactive. As for the two Charge cards I made, one was for Shaman and the other was for - Priest? Yup! I figured the coolest way to have Charge on a card was through conditional effects, that way the player has to work for the benefit of having Charge.

  • Choose One: I enjoy making cards with Choose One effects; it's literally giving the player choice, which is always a good thing. Of course, these cards are locked into Druid since it's a part of their identity and wouldn't make sense in any other class!

  • Combo: There's not a lot to say here; I made 4 Combo cards, and they're all for Rogue!

  • Deathrattle: Deathrattle is quite often seen as a counterpart to Battlecry, and in my opinion these two keywords are the most significant ones in Hearthstone. It makes sense that the keyword with the second highest amount of cards is Deathrattle, but what surprises me is that I never made a Shaman card with Deathrattle, especially considering how many Shaman cards I made!

  • Discover: Discover is a pretty simple keyword, and I often have a hard time coming up with interesting applications for it. Because of this, I only made 7 of them despite being a pretty popular keyword, with the only class card being one for Priest!

  • Divine Shield: I love Divine Shield, and I often feel like there aren't enough cards in Hearthstone that play around with the potential of this keyword enough. I ended up making a handful of Divine Shield cards (with most being for Paladin, of course), but I did make one for Priest (the version posted on Reddit did not have Divine Shield) and one for Shaman.

  • Echo: Echo is my favorite keyword by a large margin, but I only made 5 cards with Echo. This is mostly because while I enjoy the keyword, it is hard to come up with an interesting design with Echo. It's very easy to make a card below power level and then slap Echo on it, but that isn't really that thought-provoking for me.

  • Freeze: You know what class is known for Freeze effects? Mage. Oh, and also Shaman that one time in Knights of the Frozen Throne where Freeze Shaman was pushed. That archetype didn't do so well at all, and because of how much I like Shaman and how much I liked Freeze Shaman as a concept, I ended up making more Shaman cards with Freeze than I did for Mage or even the Neutral class!

  • Immune: I ended up making more cards for Immune than a lot of the other keywords in the game, and that's because I feel like it's a heavily under-explored keyword. What I learned from making these is that the Hearthstone community is deathly afraid of Immune keywords, with most of these cards being labeled as "over powered" with little to no explanation. I can see why, since Immune takes out an entire level of interaction with just one keyword, but if the card with Immune has some sort of difficult condition or allows for the opponent to interact with disabling the Immunity, then I feel like the card could actually work in the game. There's a lot of fear around this keyword, but I think that's just because of how little it has been explored in the real game.



  • Inspire: I only made one card with Inspire (which turned out to be my fourth favorite card of the year!) and it makes sense why. Inspire was only printed during The Grand Tournament, and even then rarely anyone used a lot of Inspire cards. This leaves the keyword to be forgotten, which is sad since I think the keyword has a lot of cool potential!

  • Invoke: Descent of Dragons was released towards the end of 2019, meaning I didn't have a lot of time to really be exposed to the Invoke keyword introduced in the expansion. Because of this, I only ended up making one card with Invoke.

  • Lackey: The whole Lackey keyword is strange in that there's both a lot of design space when creating new Lackeys but there's really not too much room for interesting design when it comes to cards involving Lackeys (it's still possible, but it's nowhere near the same level as things like Battlecry or Overkill). Because of this divide in design space for Lackeys, I ended up making one card for each part: a card that interacts with Lackeys and a new design for a Lackey. Once I made these, I had my fun with the keyword and felt no need to experiment any more!

  • Lifesteal: I can't really say too much about Lifesteal because it's a very pastable keyword. What I mean by this is that you can just slap it onto most anything, and often it's difficult to create interesting uses for the keyword. That being said, I did make two cards that I think use Lifesteal in their own interesting ways: one that gives your hero Lifesteal and one that has a damaging effect when drawn!

  • Magnetic: It seems like I thought Mech Paladin was much more interesting than any other class with Mechs, since they were the only class outside of Neutral that got Magnetic cards! I think with the inclusion of Kangor's Endless Army and Mechano-Egg in Paladin's arsenal, the idea of Mech Paladin is much more enticing to me than any other class.

  • Mega-Windfury: Mega-Windfury has only been printed twice in Hearthstone, and there's a good reason for it: it's too good! Because of that, I never felt inclined to make a Mega-Windfury card other than the one day where the theme required it. But the one Mega-Windfury card I made ended up being my personal favorite card of mine of the year!

  • Overkill: It makes sense seeing Overkill being fairly evenly spread out over the classes since it's a very expandable keyword; there's a lot of room for interesting designs with it since it's a condition as opposed to an effect. What's strange to me is that I never made a Neutral Overkill card; one might think that because of how open-ended Overkill cards can be, I would've made one for the most open-ended category of cards!

  • Overload: Thirteen Overload cards... Wow... I mean hey, I've said this many times and I'll say it again: I love Shaman! Not only that, but on top of Overload just being a part of Shaman's core identity, I tried so many different times to come up with ways to Overload your opponent. I guess all of those attempts really add up!

  • Poisonous: Not much to say here other than "of course". The three classes I would think of when thinking of Poisonous cards are definitely Rogue, Hunter, and Druid (although the Druid relation is much weaker than the other two), so it makes sense that I only made a handful of Poisonous cards for those three classes and Neutral.

  • Quest: Despite Quests being one of my favorite keywords, I only ever made two Quests. This is definitely because of the amount of time it takes to make a good Quest; I only had so much time to make cards when I was making one every day. And even then, both Quests were made with a very strong purpose: one was made for a theme that necessitated it, and the other was the final card of the year to celebrate the completion of my own Quest!

  • Reborn: I have a funny relationship with Reborn. When the keylord was revealed, I thought it was honestly kiiiinda lame, but when the Saviors of Uldum expansion came out, I fell in love with the keyword: it's so simple and really fun to play with. As for the cards I made with Reborn, there's only a couple, with the only class cards being one for Paladin and one for Druid.



  • Recruit: I was never a fan of the recruit keyword since you could easily type out its effect and it wouldn't be that long. I guess that's the reason why I only made one card with Recruit!

  • Rush: Rush is probably the single best keyword added to Hearthstone objectively since it essentially allows for minions to have pseudo-Charge while still being interactable from the opponent. It also has a lot of room for interesting design, since there's a lot of cool interactions that can stem off of or work well with Rush. Because of this, I made quite a number of cards with Rush, but I never made any for Mage or Priest. This is because I see those two classes as more spell-focused and don't really ever see a need for them to have any interesting Rush minions.

  • Secret: Now, you might be thinking: 'Woah, why did you make Secrets for Shaman, Druid, and Warlock? Those classes aren't allowed to have Secrets!'. You are correct; I included cards that use the "Secretly" keyword as seen in the card Fatespinner, where something happens that either you or your opponent (or both) are not aware of. But that being said, I did design three Secrets for Shaman!

  • Sidequest: Since Descent of Dragons came out at the end of the year, I didn't have a lot of time to make Sidequests since the keyword just didn't exist for most of the year. I do really like the keyword though, so I did end up making not only one Sidequest but TWO: one for Warrior and one for Shaman!

  • Silence: Seeing as how Priest is the only class that has any sort of identity related to Silence, it makes sense that I only made Silence cards for Priest and Neutral. I did make more Silence Priest cards than I did for Neutral, and that's because I really like playing Silence Priest!

  • Spell Damage: The only class that I made Spell Damage cards for is for Mage, and that's because Mage has such a strong connection to spells, more so than other class I would argue. In fact, over 20% of the cards I made for Mage have to do with Spell Damage!

  • Start of Game: Start of Game effects are very difficult to make since they are more consistent than any other keyword. Because of how you are guaranteed to get their effect to activate, the two cards I made for this keyword a have a symmetrical effect for both players! The card I made for Shaman has a negative effect for both players, and the card I made for Priest (which was initially posted as a Neutral card but was then changed) has a positive effect for both players!

  • Stealth: Stealth is a very basic keyword, and it makes sense that I made more Stealth cards for Rogue than for any other class since it's the sneakiest class. With that said, I did try to explore outside of the norm and make a card with Stealth for both Hunter and, more notably, Paladin!

  • Taunt: Taunt is a very simple keyword that's been in Hearthstone since its release, and to this day remains as one of the best and most consistent defensive options in the game. I made at least one Taunt card for every single class except for Rogue and Mage. Rogue didn't get any because I see that class as much more aggressively focused, so having Taunt cards doesn't fit too well. Mage didn't get any because it's much less minion-focused than any other class in my opinion, and you can't give spells Taunt!

  • Twinspell: Twinspell is a mechanic that was only given to the "good" classes in Rise of Shadows, meaning Warrior, Rogue, Hunter, Priest, and Shaman don't have any Twinspell cards. That being said, the only class I made Twinspell cards for was Rogue, which I think is really funny. There are two reasons for this: first of all, Rogue's identity with Combo cards and playing lots of small spells works really well mechanically with Twinspell. Second, Rogue is known for stealing cards, so stealing a keyword from the good classes makes sense! I also am not a fan of narratively locked mechanics - it makes sense for the one expansion to have keywords locked for good and evil classes, but Twinspell isn't a part of any class' core identity, so creating cards with Twinspell for the evil classes is fine in my books.

  • Windfury: While Windfury isn't by any means a Shaman-specific keyword, that's definitely the first class people think of when they think of Windfury (outside of maybe Neutral). It makes sense that I made more windfury cards for Shaman than any other class, but I did make one Windfury card for Warlock!



And with that, I can finally say that the 365 Days of Hearthstone challenge is officially over! It was a blast to partake in this challenge and push myself to do something every day for a year, and I can definitely say I have grown to be a much better designer since the beginning of 2019, especially with regards to card games and card design theory. This challenge may be over, but I'll never stop playing card games and I'll never stop loving Hearthstone. I'll also keep designing cards, but maaaaybe not every day anymore.


If you made it this far, it means you either skipped aaaaaall the way to the end, or you actually read through this whole thing. Either way, I want to say thank you for reading even a single word from this blog post. It's huge, but that's because there's an entire year's worth of content crammed into here!


So that's that! Not sure how to really end this blog post, so I'll just end it here. :)

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